Getting Dressed & Undressed

***Sensative Material Disclaimer – Due to the sensitive nature of dressing and undressing, we will not show a video of a child getting dressed or undressed. We will however offer advice on tips for dressing and undressing with text, audio, and through other means. Some “getting dressed” techniques will be explained via video too – for example, putting on a coat, hat, sweater, shoes, etc. This techniques can be carried over to undergarments, pants, etc.

Undressing

The objective of undressing is for your child to be independently able to undress him/herself.

We’ll use taking of a pair of pants as an example.

Instructions for Lesson

  1. Sit or stand on the floor with your child.
  2. Engage your child by saying your child’s name or touching your child’s arm.
  3. Pull your child’s pants down to your child’s knees, then say “(your child’s name) pull down pants”.
  4. Perfect outcome: your child reaches down and pulls down his/her pants. Praise success.

Not so perfect outcome: your child just stands there.

  • Reengage your child and repeat the instruction: “(child’s name) pull down pants”. You then prompt your child to pull down his/her pants. Repeat the steps from above. Always praise success and or effort.
  • Then help your child to take of the pants completely.

Breakdown of deconstruction for “taking off pants.”

  1. Pull down pants half way
  2. Pull down pants all the way
  3. Open button
  4. Open zipper
  5. Pull pants down all the way
  6. Take on leg out
  7. Take the other leg out
  8. Take pants off

Summary

Since you are working on each step separately help your child with taking off the article of clothing after each step is completed. This concept works for any other piece of clothing as well: shirts, undershirts, underwear, sweaters, shoes, socks, swim suits, jackets, hats, and gloves.

Items you need

Shirt -Pants -Sweater -jacket -gloves – hat -shoes -socks – or any other piece of clothing.

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Autism Support Now is a Parent advisory blog and media site presented by "Ella's Hope for Autism" a 501c3 public charity in Missouri. This site is built for parents dealing with Autism . . . by parents dealing with Autism. Hope and Sam McPheeters (founders of Ella's Hope) have two children on the spectrum, and strive to provide continued advice for other parents, who are dealing with the same issues..