Receptive Instructions

Receptive Instructions

The objective is for your child to be able to follow simple commands.

What to do

1. You sit in front of your child.
2. You engage your child by saying his/her name and or touching his/her arm.
3. Once you got your child’s attention you say “Clap hands”
4. Perfect outcome: your child claps.
5. Reinforce/Praise success.
6. Not so perfect outcome: your child touches his nose.
a. Reengage your child by saying his/her name and or touching his/her arm and repeat the instruction “Clap hands”, then prompt your child (take your child’s hand and put them together) to clap. After that engage your child again and repeat. If your child does it great, reinforce. If not repeat the step from above. I’d repeat it three times and if your child still is not getting it move on to a different task and come back to it later. Also once your child gets the prompted instruction right, redirect your child to a simple task he/she has mastered and then go back to the original instruction to make sure your child got it.
It might take your child a couple of days maybe even a couple of weeks to understand the concept of Receptive Instructions. Don’t’ get frustrated and follow through with the program. Your child will get it! Receptive instructions are a great building block for many other programs. In the video you will see a demonstration of how to run a “Receptive Instructions” program. If you have any further questions or concerns please feel free to contact me at ———-.

Items you need:

in the beginning you will need no materials. Here are some ideas on what to start with:
clap hands
wave
pat head
touch nose
wiggle ears
arms up
arms to side
jump (jumping is hard, it’s a skill that is learned over time. For beginners if your child “just” stands up on his/her tippy toes that’s perfectly fine, from there it can progress to tippy toes with bend knees, then one foot of the ground, and eventually both feet off the ground)
sit
turn around
pick up
throw
find
bring
point to

THE NEXT STEP . . .

Receptive Instructions with travel

The objective is for your child to be able to follow simple commands which includes retrieving items from afar.

What to do

1. Place the desire item in the room you’re going to send your child to.
2. Sit at the table or on the floor with your child.
3. Engage your child by saying his/her name and or touching his/her arm.
4. Once you have your child’s attention say “Go to the kitchen and get a cup”.
5. Perfect outcome: your child goes to the kitchen and gets the cup.

6. Not so perfect outcome: your child gets up but doesn’t go anywhere.
a. Sit your child back at the table or floor and reengage. Repeat the instruction and then take your child to the kitchen and get the cup. Go back to where you came from, reengage your child, repeat the instruciotn. If your child follows the instruction reinforce, if not I’d repeat it three times and if your child is still not getting it move on to a different task and come back to it later. Also once your child gets the prompted instruction right, redirect your child to a simple task he/she has mastered and then go back to the original instruction to make sure your child got it.

Expectations

It might take your child a couple of days maybe even a couple of weeks to understand the concept of Receptive Instructions with travel. Don’t’ get frustrated and follow through with the program. Your child will get it! In the video you will see a demonstration of how to run a “Receptive Instructions” program.

Items you need:

Anything your child can retrieve from a different location than where you’re at. Make sure the item is in plain sight and easy for your child to access.
Cup
Book
Toy
Game
Electronic device
Snack
Shoe
Jacket
Towel
Rag
Phone
Toothbrush

SHARE
Autism Support Now is a Parent advisory blog and media site presented by "Ella's Hope for Autism" a 501c3 public charity in Missouri. This site is built for parents dealing with Autism . . . by parents dealing with Autism. Hope and Sam McPheeters (founders of Ella's Hope) have two children on the spectrum, and strive to provide continued advice for other parents, who are dealing with the same issues..